Dirty South reveals his darkish aspect on brooding 'darko' LP [Album Review] – EDM All Day

Dirty South reveals his darkish aspect on brooding 'darko' LP [Album Review] – EDM All Day

Dirty South is a person of his phrase. He promised followers two albums earlier than the 12 months was out, and all of a sudden darko arrived proper within the nick of time. Just a month after releasing the beautiful XV, the cinematic home titan submitted yet one more chapter to his lengthy participant historical past – and it’s in contrast to any challenge the producer has helmed to this point.

For some, it might have made sense to launch each fall albums as a double LP. Yet Dirty South’s choice to separate the 2 initiatives makes good sense when listening. Both are worlds aside in feeling, tone, and stream. XV was brilliantly bouncy, usually bursting with waves of elation; darko, however, is one thing completely different with a extra anxious mindset all its personal. The mournful synth swells of “Temps” announce the challenge’s ethos instantly, and the sensation of unrest permeates all through the remainder of the journey. On “Cassetta,” the intro burns slowly earlier than ascending chords unfold the strain on thick. “Piksi” follows straight behind, which is shaping as much as be one of many darkest tracks in Dirty South’s repertoire.

Despite the unity of darko‘s world, trademark Dirty South touches abound. While the beaming brightness of previous hits like “If It All Stops” is nowhere to be discovered, the “Kino” shuffles and grooves as undeniably as any of the artist’s dance flooring weapons. “Lava” is a rhythmic tour-de-force, regardless of snarling horn-like synth blasts tethering it firmly into the album’s aesthetic. But regardless of Dirty South’s mastery of vocal-infused efforts present in previous releases on labels like Anjunabeats, darko stays starkly instrumental. The transfer feels calculated because the preparations ebb and stream freely, leaving the listener to surprise if any lyrics might converse single-handedly for the soul of the report.

The producer admitting the report is his favourite to this point might point out this new sonic path — additionally showcased in songs like his latest remix of Lane eight’s “No Captain” — is settling in to remain awhile. The relentless cohesion of darko is one thing Dirty South had but to do at this degree. As “Corda” looms into sight to cap off the album, it units the thoughts on hearth. There’s a way that the gravity of the sum of its components has seeped in, and the impact after listening to the LP’s entirety is vivid. It’s gripped in an environment of anxious and electrical craving, soundtracking a sense of introspection and uncooked starvation. Beautiful however stark, darkish however restrained, mournful however energized; whether or not or not these tracks invade the identical playlists and dance flooring Dirty South has presided over all these years is irrelevant. For an announcement as nuanced and unified as darko is a triumphant spotlight in and of itself.