Futuristic Polar Bears & Jesus Davila – Horns Of Fire

Futuristic Polar Bears & Jesus Davila – Horns Of Fire

• Mexican influences in the production • Commonplace structure, repetitive • Lack of originality considering the leading artist If the …


Mexican influences in the production
Commonplace structure, repetitive
Lack of originality considering the leading artist


If the name CMMD Records rings a bell in your mind somehow, then your memory is certainly commendable enough. The label created by Futuristic Polar Bears, went under our radars over these years (with its inaugurating release being in 2018). Months of silence after, we are witnessing the tenth offering, “Horns Of Fire“: a studio collaboration shared between the skillful Big Room producers and the budding but talented Mexican name Jesus Davila. The explosive style is certainly back… but with lesser expectations to anticipate.

Now, the Mexican influences can be easily noticed, since tonality of the song revolves around this particular ethnic theme. “Spanglish” (Modernistic hybrid between Spanish and English language) vocal lead the instrumental, which feels a tad bit annoying to listen to throughout the duration. Even though I am a native speaker of the mentioned language, comprehending some of the words were difficult even to me, adding to the mild frustration of it looping over again and again and becoming repetitive.

Coming to the drop segment, “Horns Of Fire” did not blow my mind but was decently enjoyable. It is obvious that the British producers did most of the job, as they are counted as veterans in this specific genre. Their signature of low-distorted synths assorted with recognizable kicks and claps are predictable here, albeit monotonous and lacking originality to some ends. The melody is easier to recount and is hooking, but then again my complaint extends further to this part as well.

It is tiring to see how lesser efforts are being made to keep this once thriving genre alive, and mainstream competitors such as Rave Culture have become the fulcrum of its survival (and even developments). “Horns Of Fire” could appease faithful to the core Big Room fans, and I understand the good intentions behind the making of this composition, but I cannot attest and recommend it more than necessary.

You can listen to “Horns Of Fire” here:

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