Kim Kline – Stand Tall

Kim Kline – Stand Tall

ArtistRack brings to you the superb visuals for ‘Stand Tall’ by the proficient Kim Kline: In her early singles, Kim Kline …

ArtistRack brings to you the superb visuals for ‘Stand Tall’ by the proficient Kim Kline:

In her early singles, Kim Kline established herself as an artist to be reckoned with: a singer with a pop-rock poise and sound, and a author and singer able to expressing highly effective and sophisticated feelings in her songs. Even those that fell in love with Kline upon listening to her daring, confessional self-titled debut album won’t be prepared for “Stand Tall,” her latest single, and the primary observe launched from her upcoming album Exhale. Prior Kline songs have been self-examinations. On “Stand Tall,” the Texas-born singer-songwriter turns that very same penetrating gaze outward – and he or she’s involved by what she sees. The observe takes on one of many scourges of contemporary American society: bullying. Kline, who has by no means been one to again down from a problem, pulls no punches.

The videogenic Kline radiates a lot confidence onscreen that it’s arduous to consider that she, too, was bullied as a baby. She’s overcome that have, however she is aware of firsthand how a lot harm bullying can do. Kim Kline sings “Stand Tall” with the compassion of a survivor and the frankness of an educator. Producer Cristian Robles is not any stranger to significant music – over his prolonged profession, he’s labored with considerate, socially-conscious artists comparable to Peter Gabriel, Celine Dion, Rolling Stones, and Sting – and he makes certain that “Stand Tall” has sufficient sweetness to focus on Kline’s charms and sufficient muscle to make its message manifest. “Stand Tall” is tight, direct, simple: a track created with a function by an artist pushed to make a distinction.

Kim Kline is aware of that in a majority of instances, intervention from an outdoor social gathering is sufficient to cease a bully useless in his tracks. That’s why the message to “Stand Tall” is directed not merely towards victims. It’s a missive to passive observers, too – an entreaty to become involved. Kline and video director Clark Langon make that clear of their heat and uplifting clip for “Stand Tall”: the heroes of the video embody these courageous sufficient to intervene throughout acts of bullying. Langon, like Robles, is an skilled hand whose observe document consists of many initiatives made by artists with philanthropic impulses: Alicia Keys, Brad Paisley, Chvrches, and others. He is aware of methods to inform a narrative that speaks on to the consciences of viewers, and within the “Stand Tall” clip, he does so by permitting those that’ve been bullied to specific themselves immediately, in cardboard and ink, straight at his digital camera.