Lost Labels of Yesterday: The Bearded Man & Armada Trice

Lost Labels of Yesterday: The Bearded Man & Armada Trice

Welcome to our first exclusive series for this year, “Lost Labels Of Yesterday”. In this trilogy, we will remind ourselves …

Welcome to our first exclusive series for this year, “Lost Labels Of Yesterday”. In this trilogy, we will remind ourselves of music imprints that decided to hit the brake; whether long-forgotten or recently abandoned. While this would not be an in-depth analysis, we will attempt to find the reason on why these once thriving labels had to forfeit their potential and cease operation.

Inaugurating the series will be Armada Music’s “The Bearded Man”. During mid of the 10s, the electronic scene got increasingly interested towards the genre of Tropical House. The mentioned sub-label broke into popularity when a talented young Belgian named Lost Frequencies decided to remix “Are You With Me” (performed by the American singer Easton Corbin), which was later promoted as a single after being signed. Before anyone knew it, this version skyrocketed around the globe and so did “The Bearded Man”.

Over the years, various renowned acts such as Sick Individuals and an expanding roster of upcoming acts would enhance this label’s reputation further. Keeping an instantly recognizable theme of laid-back guitar-driven Deep House sound (and the bearded man emblem, of course), it slackened pace by the time 2017 would arrive. The reasons seemed obvious: gradual decline of Tropical and Chill House and Armada’s greater focus for their main label. Unfortunately, looks like the bearded man finally got the time to shave.

Second candidate would be a favourite of many here: Armada Trice. Born amidst explosion of Electro/Big Room House, this sub-label became the forefront of festival music along with its counterparts like Mainstage music (now Rave Culture) and Revealed Recordings. It became a recurring place for records from heavyweights such as Dash Berlin, Arston, Vigel and Maurice West. Unlike it’s demised relative discussed earlier, Trice’s peculiar transition to radio-friendly music and Armada’s lesser interest in the later years aided in its downfall.

While the last release from Trice happened over a year ago, it got rebranded to fit with the releases on Armada. It is safe to say that it has reached an unexpected end and probably won’t be revived under its own domain again.

That is it for the first part of “Lost Labels Of Yesterday”

What do you think about these record labels and what are your favourite tracks released by them? Stay tuned as we talk about the next two names from our list this time of the week!