This K-POP Group Admits to Ripping off The Chainsmokers & Coldplay

This K-POP Group Admits to Ripping off The Chainsmokers & Coldplay

The sweet and sappy production The Chainsmokers is by and large the key to their lucrative commercial success. Their simplistic chord progression formula was even the topic a discussion and breakdown by a keen-eared teen back in .

 

 

It goes without saying that the Chainsmokers have nailed a certain radio-friendly sound that is catchy at best, and repetitive at worst. K-Pop group Seventeen seemed to have wanted a taste that chart-topping glory, because they are currently under fire on social media for what many are claiming plagiarism. The song in question is Seventeen’s biggest hit to date, “Don’t Wanna Cry,” that bares an undeniable similarity to the Chainsmokers/Coldplay collab “Something Just Like This.”

The record is a virtual copy-and-paste the Chainsmokers hit, with a heightened pitch sprinkled in. The publishing company the k-pop band, Pledis Entertainment decided to get ahead the scandal in full on damage control by adding the Chainsmokers and Coldplay to the track’s ASCAP, in short, adding them to the copyright. Pledis also released the following statement:

 

“We received inquiries about the similarity some the melodies between the songs from the two publishing parties. We are asserting that ‘Don’t Wanna Cry’ is an independently created song but we were worried that the artists would suffer a great amount stress if it came to legal disputes and that their image might adversely be affected regardless the truth. Because the listed reasons above, we decided to grant/acknowledge a piece copyright to them.”

They concluded the statement by saying,

“In fact, if you check the list copyright holders to this song, the names the artists who participated remain the same. We would like to apologize to all the artists and fans who were worried and concerned due to the company’s decision.”

No ficial word from The Chainsmokers has been shared as yet, but stay tuned for updates.